THE ROYAL TIMELINE OF OZ

 

Other Realms and Fairylands Outside Oz

 

Oz is not the only otherworld out there!

 

Other realms exist beyond the borders of the Nonestic, places with names like Wonderland, Neverland, the Dreamlands, and many more that are known of in the pages of fantasy books and fairytales. The stories listed in this section have been shown to exist in the same universe — if not necessarily the same realm —as Oz. The continuity notes under each story or series will reflect in what Oz stories these crossovers occur. Much of this is currently under investigation and will be for some time. Note that fantasy lands that are known to exist in and around Nonestica (e.g., Borderlands of Oz) are not included here, as they're already part of the narrative found on the Mainline Timeline.

 

 

 

 

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Continuity notes: Several sources bring this epic poem into Oz continuity, Marcus Mebes and Jeff Rester's The Royal Explorers of Oz: Book 3 and W.W. Denslow's The Pearl and the Pumpkin, which was brought into continuity by Wooglet in Oz, and  brings the events of this epic poem into the Oz universe. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prince Silverwings and Other Fairy Tales

Continuity notes: L. Frank Baum collaborated with Prince Silverwings author Edith Ogden Harrison on a 1904 musical extravaganza (which never came to pass), a stage-play that saw the beginnings of the Nome King, Trot, Polychrome, and the premise of three Oz books.  It seems appropriate then to consider this work as part of the Ozian universe. 

 

There is one seeming contradiction, however.  In "The City of the Sea King," Harrison establishes that the Mer-folk were first established by the marriage of a mortal Princess Selpan to the Sea King, which is how the mermaids came about.  In The Sea Fairies, however, Clia says, "But the mermaids lived before fishes and before mankind."  Harrison's story can be viewed as such: the Sea King did take a mortal princess to be his bride, but she wasn't the first mermaid, as mermaids existed prior to humans, but rather the first of a certain kind of mermaid.

 

The stories included in this volume appear to describe a much older time period, perhaps taking place in a Borderlands country like Yew or Ix, or even a pre-Oz Oz.  In one story, the land is called the Happy Valley. 

 

In the Scenario and General Synopsis of Prince Silverwings, by Pamami Press, it can be seen that Baum was intending to name the Gnome King in the stage-play Kwytoffle, though when that didn't pan out, it instead became the name of the false-magician and ruler of Auriel on the Isle of Yew.  A better predecessor of Roquat, possibly an uncle might be the Nome King Goldemar (of Zauberlinda the Wise Witch), though that has not yet been established in any story as of yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There (includes Jabberwocky)

Continuity notes: Crossovers occur in several stories, currently under investigation.

 

 

 

 

 

Zauberlinda, the Wise Witch

History: This well written story by Eva Katherine Gibson takes place in what could be termed “nature’s fairyland,” and more closely resembles what Baum would later do with his Twinkle Tales and Policeman Bluejay.  It has been wrongly denigrated as an Oz imitator, in part because its layout resembles Denslow’s work on The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and there is a little girl from the Black Hills of South Dakota who goes on an adventure to a fairy land with her pet cat, and a Good Witch who wields a wand with a ‘Z’ on it, remarkably like the ‘OZ’ wand seen held by the Good Witch of the North, but her role serves a different purpose. There is also a megalomaniacal “Gnome King” with his underground dominion, but he precedes Baum’s by at least three years. 

 

The Pumpernickel Press edition contains articles by Phyllis Ann Karr and Sean Duffley, which discuss the similarities and departures, as well as the many merits of this story.  An adaptation was published by the South Dakota State Historical Society Press (who also did two Baum adaptations The Discontented Gopher and the Enchanted Buffalo) called The Prairie Dog Prince.

 

Continuity notes:

Circus: While Annie says it's the "greatest show on earth," which would seem to be a reference to Ringling Bros & Barnum & Bailey Circus," there are several factors to consider, not least of which is that it appears that they never came to her town.  She notes the date as June 21st (the date of her birthday).  But there is no Cave City known by that name in South Dakota, although, South Dakota is home to several of the world's most extensive cave-systems, so perhaps the author was using an older tribal name, or a colloquial name for one of the nearby cities.  Annie says she lives near Wind Cave (which does exist) and the closest city to her is Hot Springs, which seems to be where the circus comes, as the trip her friend Pete makes to the city is within a day's time by wagon, as he leaves in the morning and is back by evening.  The only circus that appears to have visited Hot Springs (or really any nearby city) was the Lemen Bros on May 19th, 1898 (they came to Rapid City the day before), who with 20 cars, featured a three-ring circus with an elephant, lions, tigers, white horses, lady riders and other descriptions that Annie reads about in the flyer. See here:

 

Ringling Bros did pay a visit to Huron, South Dakota on June 21st, 1897, but as Huron is five hours away from Wind Cave by automobile, it appears that the author conflated the two circus visits, merging them for her "Cave City."  In view of the story, it can be either assumed that Annie also conflated the two, missed the nearby May 19th circus, and had her adventures on June 21st, the date another circus was visiting her state.

 

Connections: The link between Oz, Pix-Sylvania and the Enchanted Wood, the Wise Witch Zauberlinda, the Great Shamaness, the Tah-Tipuu of Oz, the Gnome King Goldemar, the Gnome King Kwytoffle (of Prince Silverwings) and the Nome King Roquat, and other links will be established in an upcoming work.  Goldemar might be king at this time due to the fact that Roquat was turned into a lizard by Glinda in 1893 (see Cory in Oz).

 

Dating: The story is set in 1898 based on Annie's account of the circus being in town. 

 

 

 

 

 

Yama Yama Land

Story: Sylvia's 10th birthday is marked by the departure of her uncle Jack to the North Pole, and an earthquake which takes her into an interior world.  There, she meets a kind Yama named Bibbo who guides her through several strange places.

 

Continuity Notes: The date is April 18, 1906, as the story is set in motion by the San Francisco earthquake.

 

Considered an Oz imitator, author Boylan's hollow-earth story was based on a popular song ("The Yama Yama Man") of the time.  Boylan was a friend of Baum and Gibson (Zauberlinda the Wise Witch). 

 

This story is due to be tied into Oz in a forthcoming work.

 

 

 

 

 

The King of Gee-Whiz

History: From 1902 to 1905, Baum intended to produce a stage-production of an earlier version of The King of Gee-Whiz (of which a scenario of the story has been published in Alla T. Ford's The Musical Fantasies of L. Frank Baum) that was first called Montezuma, then The Son of the Sun, and finally The King of Gee-Whiz, which never came to pass. Hough eventually decided to rewrite the story and publish it as a book, which he did the following year in 1906. As Baum had worked with author Emerson Hough on this project, it seems appropriate to consider this story as taking place in Baum's larger universe. 

 

Continuity notes: The Secret Valley of the Fairies is called Amalena, and its Fairy Queen is Zulena.  The Wizards of Silver and Gold makes it clear that this is the same fairy as Zurline.

 

 

 

 

 

The Golden Goblin

Story: Forthcoming

 

Continuity notes:

Dating: The narrative is explicitly dated by Jan, who notes upon seeing the Flying Dutchman that it began sailing the seas 250 years ago, and was first cursed in 1653, dating their adventure to 1903.  Given the calmness of the winds in the Indian Ocean, it is likely May to October.

 

 

 

 

The Pinkies and the Winkies

History: This 21 page pamphlet, published by Eldridge Entertainment House in 1913, and written as a play by Elizabeth F. Guptill, has been cited as one of several attempts to cash in on the success of the Oz phenomenon, but any connections are purely tenuous 

 

Story: Dorothy—not Dorothy Gale; has an adventure with her brother, named Reginald. Tote—not Toto—is a child from Mars, and there are bad fairies called “Winkies”—not Winkies from Oz. In the story, Santa takes wandering children back to Earth.

 

Continuity notes

There is no known connection to Oz, but is listed here due to the commonality of this title being linked to Oz.

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens

(aka. The Little White Bird, or Adventures in Kensington Gardens)

 

Peter and Wendy

Synopsis and continuity notes: Forthcoming

 

Peter Pan and Wendy's story and characters were brought into continuity in An Ozian Odyssey. There, it's noted that the ending, which J.M. Barrie added four years after the story's publication, was untrue. Wendy and her brothers did not grow up or remain in the outside world. Nor did Wendy marry and have a daughter and granddaughter.

 

 

 

 

 

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

 

The Mysterious Island

Synopsis and continuity notes: Forthcoming

 

The adventures of Captain Nemo in these books was brought into continuity in An Ozian Odyssey. There, it's noted that Captain Nemo's death did not occur, as person who'd told the story to the author, Jules Verne, was not aware that he'd survived.

 

 

 

 

1899-1904

Tales of the Magic Land

 

1938  The Wizard of the Emerald City

Alexander Volkov

Tales of Magic Land Vol. 1, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007); Ts.K.V.L.S.M. Publishing House (1939); Soviet Russia Publishers (1959); Chapter 5: "Ellie in the Clutches of the Ogre" was reprinted in Oz-Story Magazine #3, Hungry Tiger Press (1997)

1938  Urfin Jus and his Wooden Soldiers

Alexander Volkov

Tales of Magic Land Vol. 1, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007); Soviet Russia Publishers (1963); Opium Books;

1938  The Seven Underground Kings

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1969); Opium Books; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 2, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007)

1946  The Fiery God of the Marrans

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1972); As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 2, Red Branch Press (1993, 2007)

1946  The Yellow Fog 

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1974); Buckethead; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 3, Red Branch Press (2007);

1946  The Mystery of the Deserted Castle 

Alexander Volkov

Soviet Russia Publishers (1976); Buckethead; As Tales of Magic Land Vol. 3, Red Branch Press (2007);

History: If anything qualifies as an alternate or parallel Oz universe, this series by Russian-born Alexander Volkov does. With the exception of his very first book, which is a Russian adaptation of the The Wonderful Wizard of Oz written in 1939 and revised twenty years later. It's popularity led to five sequels from 1963 to 1975. Volkov took his series in an entirely different direction than Baum. His version of Oz was the “Magic Land” or Goodvinia, and although the characters bear certain similarities to Baum’s, they are also unique creations all onto their own. March Laumer, under his Opium Press label, had Mary G. Langford produce a translation of Urfin Jus and His Wooden Soldiers (published as The Wooden Soldiers of Oz), while Buckethead Enterprises of Oz published Laumer's own translations of The Yellow Fog (as Yellow Fog Over Oz) and The Mystery of the Deserted Castle (as The Secret of the Deserted Castle). The most well known, extant, and well regarded translations are Peter Blystone's (who initially published the first four stories as Tales of the Magic Land volumes 1 and 2 by Red Branch Press).  Currently, all six of Laumer's are available on Lulu.com. 

 

Some confusion had at one time arisen with Opium and Buckethead's versions, as they substituted the name Oz for Goodvinia, and Dorothy for Ellie, amongst other changes, when in fact the two fairylands are quite distinct from one other. Blystone has corrected this in his more accurate translations. In 1974, Russian TV adapted the first three books as The Wizard of the City of Emeralds.

 

 

 

The Emerald Rain

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

The Witch Arachna

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

The Abalone Pearl

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

The Apparitions from Elming

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

Prisoners of the Coral Reef

Yuri Kuznetzov

Yaroslavl

History: These are the first Russian sequels to Volkov’s final 'Magic Land' book, The Mystery of the Deserted Castle.

 

 

 

Further Tales of the Magic Land

 

In the Clutches of the Sea Monster

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Serpent with the Amber Eyes

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Treasure of the Emerald Bees

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Curse of the Dragon King

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The False Fairy

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Curse of the Copper Forest

Nikolai Bachnow

LeiV

The Adventures of the Evil Magician Astozor and his Tailor Lowen Lowenbrull

Lazar Steinmetz

LeiV

The Encyclopedia of Magic Land

Lazar Steinmetz

LeiV

History: From 1996 to 2002, these German titles were published continuing Volkov's Magic Land series. It is not known if they harmonize with the sequels produced by Yuri Kuznetzov or Sergei Sukhinov, or if they form a separate continuity.

The Iron Woodman and Strasheela in the Snow City

Liza Adams

Sovremen Literatura

The New Adventures of the Iron Woodman and Strasheela

Liza Adams

Sovremen Literatura

The Iron Woodman and Elli

Sergei Zaitsev

(unknown)

Buratino (Pinocchio) in the Emerald City

Leonid Vladimirsky

Astrel

History: Not much is known about these additional Russian sequels (one written by Volkov's original illustrator Leonid Vladimirsky) from the late '90s.

 

 

 

"Ellie in the Emerald City," aka the Tales of the Emerald City series

Goodwin the Great and Terrible

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (1999)

Gingema's Daughter: Book 1

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (1999)

The Fairy of the Emerald City: Book 2

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (1999)

The Sorceress Villina's Secret: Book 3

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (1999)

The Sorcerer's Sword: Book 4

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2000)

Eternally Youthful Stella: Book 5

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2000)

Parcelius the Alchemist: Book 6

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2000)

Battle in Underground Land: Book 7

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2000)

King Midgety: Book 8

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2001)

The Sorcerer from Atlantis: Book 9

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2001)

The Knights of Light and Darkness: Book 10

Sergei Sukhinov (English version translated by Peter Blystone)

Red Branch Press (2014); Armada Press (2001)

History:  Following on the success of Volkov’s Magic Land series, Sergei Sukhinov has taken the alternate Oz universe into yet a third branch. Set fifty years after Volkov’s first book, The Wizard of the Emerald City (which was Volkov's adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz), Sukhinov has forged a new series continuing the adventures of Ellie.  This is more of a ten-volume Tolkeinesque-styled saga. Goodwin the Great and Terrible is a prequel to the "Emerald City" series describing how Goodwin arrived in the Magic Land and constructed the Emerald City. These are now available in the U.S., thanks in no small part to the superb translations by Peter Blystone. 

 

 

 

"Fairy Tales of the Emerald City"

 

Corina the Lazy Sorceress 

Sergei Sukhinov 

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

Corina and the Ogre

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Apprentice of Sorceress Villina

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Young Dragon

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Crystal Island

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

Corina and the Magic Unicorn

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

Three in the Enchanted Forest

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Black Fog

Sergei Sukhinov

Eksmo Press (2000-2001)

The Lord of the Winged Monkeys

Sergei Sukhinov

unpublished

Bastinda and the Winged Lion

Sergei Sukhinov

Oziana #37, The International Wizard of Oz Club; originally unpublished

History: These later volumes relate the histories of the characters in Sukhinov's ten book saga mentioned above. English translations of these will also be available some time following the publication of Sukhinov's first series. This will include two stories that were written, but never published.

 

 

 

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